Boston Wildlife Sightings – September 2015

Christeen Grant of “Sitamani”:

As we were away for most of September here are a few snapshots of my sightings in the first week.

Soft misty morning in the valley below.

Soft misty morning in the valley below.

Hadeda Ibis fly to roost in golden sunset.

Hadeda Ibis fly to roost in golden sunset.

A female African Stonechat sits sentinel on Leucosidea sericea.

A female African Stonechat sits sentinel on Leucosidea sericea.

Minute flowers of Helichrysum caespititium, only 5mm in diameter.

Minute flowers of Helichrysum caespititium, only 5mm in diameter.

Ian and Jenny Lawrence of “Endeavour”:
Short way from house were 4 Wattle Cranes; 3 Blue Cranes and 5 Grey Crowned Cranes at the same time, feeding. The Blue Cranes are family, those who nest annually down at the wetland on the farm.

David and Wizz Lawrence of “The Willows”:
Four Reedbuck in the wetland; Speckled Mousebirds and Cape Robin-Chat

Bruce and Bev Astrup of “Highland Glen”:
Spotted Eagle Owl at various times in the night

Barbara and David Clulow during brief visit to Boston Country Club:
Greater Striped Swallow nest above back door of Clubhouse – their second attempt.

Greater Striped Swallow Nest

Greater Striped Swallow Nest

Presentation on 4 October 2015 at Boston Country Club on Boston birds

Very informative and well received. It was clearly reported that Boston remains a particularly rich area for birding and the number of species seen is indicative of this fact though some are under similar threats as in the rest of the country.

Crystelle Wilson

Crystelle Wilson

Caroline McKerrow and Terry Cuthbert both reported seeing a Hamerkop regularly in their region.

Crystelle Wilson of “Gramarye”:

The appearance of Yellow-billed Kites is a sure sign that Spring has arrived and migrant species are on their way back.

Yellow-billed Kite

Yellow-billed Kite

The Dark-capped Yellow Warbler is already in full voice and the others should soon add their voices to the chorus.

Dark-capped Yellow Warbler

Dark-capped Yellow Warbler

The bishops, weavers and widowbirds are changing into their breeding gear, showing some very odd feather combinations, as does the Pin-tailed Whydah.

Pin-tailed Whydah

Pin-tailed Whydah

The SABAP2 list for Elandshoek 2935_3000:
Blacksmith Lapwing, Amethyst Sunbird, Fork-tailed Drongo,

Fork-tailed Drongo

Fork-tailed Drongo

Pin-tailed Whydah, Yellow Bishop, Sombre Greenbul, Cape Canary, Southern Double-collared Sunbird, Black-shouldered Kite, Yellow-fronted Canary, Pied Starling, African Spoonbill and Grey Heron (striking up an unlikely friendship),

Grey Heron and African Spoonbill

Grey Heron and African Spoonbill

Speckled Pigeon, House Sparrow, Red-billed Quelea, Cape Longclaw, Jackal Buzzard, (this bird with immature plumage)

Jackal Buzzard with immature plumage

Jackal Buzzard with immature plumage

Red-throated Wryneck, Black Saw-wing, Cape White-eye, Southern Grey-headed Sparrow, Village Weaver, Dark-capped Bulbul, Cattle Egret,

Cattle Egret

Cattle Egret

Common Fiscal, Cape Sparrow, White-throated Swallow, Pied Crow, Speckled Mousebird, Dark-capped Yellow Warbler, Fan-tailed Widowbird, Brimstone Canary

Brimstone Canary

Brimstone Canary

Black-headed Heron, Red-necked Spurfowl, Levaillant’s Cisticola, Common Moorhen, Little Grebe, Red-capped Lark, African Pipit, Cape Weaver, Yellow-billed Duck, White-breasted Cormorant, Reed Cormorant, Bokmakierie, Southern Boubou, African Dusky Flycatcher,

African Dusky Flycatcher

African Dusky Flycatcher

Spotted Eagle-owl, Brown-throated Martin, African Darter, Black-headed Oriole, African Hoopoe, Cape Wagtail, Drakensberg Prinia, African Sacred Ibis, Long-tailed Widowbird, Southern Red Bishop, African Rail, Cape Crow, Common Waxbill,

Common Waxbill

Common Waxbill

Egyptian Goose, Spur-winged Goose, African Stonechat, Hadeda Ibis, Cape Grassbird, Helmeted Guineafowl, Cape Turtle-dove, Red-eyed Dove, Cape Robin-chat, Olive Thrush. And on 28 September I took possibly the last photograph of the Grey Crowned Crane chick which was ringed at Gramarye in February.

Grey Crowned Crane

Grey Crowned Crane

By now the bird has learned to fly, dance and perch on a tree to roost at night. It is moulting into adult feathers and has probably joined the floater flock of cranes in the district. I wish it a happy and successful life ahead!

Floater flock of Grey Crowned Cranes

Floater flock of Grey Crowned Cranes

 

 

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5 thoughts on “Boston Wildlife Sightings – September 2015

  1. Caroline McKerrow

    Sorry, bit late on the sightings. I saw reedbuck, duiker, bushbuck, A large grey mongoose (twice). An unidentified snake and a scorpion which I carefully relocated from my office to the garden. I have a photo of the scorpion but I don’t know how to get it on here. Caroline. Stormy Hill.

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